Pelvic PainThroughout any year, I generally have a few pre/postnatal clients attending my pregnancy fitness, pregnancy Pilates and postnatal classes in Nottingham with pubic, pelvic and lower back pain.

 

At the time of writing this, I have at least 5 of you with these symptoms.

 

So, I thought it would be beneficial for me to write a little piece to help you manage pelvic and lumbar pain!

 

SIT CORRECTLY

Sitting on the back of your pelvis, as opposed to sitting on your sit bones is one sure-fire way of giving yourself back and pelvic pain.

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Struggling with back pain during pregnancy?  Is your job fairly sedentary, or do you sit down at work most of your working day?  Want to make your time spent at work a little more comfortable?  Then, keep reading, because today, I’m listing 8 ways you can make working whilst pregnant, as pain-free as possible:

  • Sit on a stability ball

Sitting down all day is a sure-fire way of giving yourself back pain.  If there’s space under your desk, I’d highly recommend brining your Swiss/Birthing Ball into work with you to sit on at regular intervals.  Just sitting on a stability ball is a workout for your core, and working out your core means your back pain disappears.

 

  • Do heel lifts

When in seated, sit with your feet hip distance and heels directly under the knees.  Engage your core or pelvic floor muscles and slowly lift your right, then left heel off the floor, keeping your pelvis incredibly still.  Great for circulation and you guessed it – another workout for your lower abdominal muscles which support your back.

 

  • Stretch frequently

We all get neck, shoulder and back pain, and it’s important to stretch yourself out occasionally.  Bring your arms in front of you, drop your head down, push your hands forward and tuck your tailbone between your legs to stretch the neck, shoulders and back.

 

  • Move around regularly

Nothing like sitting down for hours only to discover when you stand up you feel 80 years old, eh?  Your circulation is generally very poor during pregnancy, so it’s vital you get up and go for a wander about as often as you can to keep blood pumping around your system and to stop you stiffening up too.

  • 25_pregnancy_exerciseHave water to hand

Always have a bottle or glass of water on your desk and sip from it frequently.  Although the side effect of drinking water equals numerous trips to the loo, this is your body’s natural process of flushing toxins and keeping your hydrated.

 

  • Do a workout/go for a walk

There’s no reason anyone can’t find 10-20 minutes in their day to do some exercise.  Whether it’s a walk in the sunshine at lunch, or a quick visit to the gym, do it.  Remember, the fitter you remain during pregnancy, the quicker you’ll bounce back after birth, and the longer you’ll be able to withstand the physical demands of labour for.  Food for thought there.

 

  • Wear flat shoes

The biomechanics of your feet change during pregnancy, and I honestly don’t care how fashion-conscious you are, ditch the high heels as soon as bump appears.  Your calves, ankles, knees and back will all thank you in the long run – trust me.  High heels and pregnancy do not mix.

 

  • Buy maternity clothes

You might think it’s unnecessary to invest money in maternity clothes, but, other mums-to-be will advise you differently.  As soon as bump starts to show, buy some maternity works trousers at least.  You’ll get sick of wearing them for the next few months, no question, but you’ll be 3,000 times more comfortable.

 

 

And there you have it.  My top tips for keeping comfortable and more pain-free whilst at work.  I hope you’ve found these tips useful.  Let me know if you’ve made some changes to your workspace and/or habits already as a result.  I’d be interested to know.

 

Does working out at lunchtime appeal to you?  Would you like some exercise ideas that are safe for all trimesters of pregnancy that you can do at home?  Click here to download a set of step-by-step pregnancy exercise worksheets you can do anywhere, anytime!

 

See you on the other side.

With so many of your suffering with back ache and pelvic pain in class at the moment, I thought I’d send you out a quick article regarding what exercise is safe to perform during pregnancy.

If you aren’t sure what Pelvic Girdle Pain is, take a look at my blog ‘What is Pelvic Girdle Pain?‘, so you’re a little more informed about what the condition is, what it affects, and why you feel pain in certain areas.

As many as 20% of women can suffer with pelvic and/or back pain during pregnancy, but I’m here to ease your mind and inform you that exercise, under the right instruction can make your symptoms better.

If you’ve ever been sat down/driving for several hours and then gone to stand up/get out of your car and felt like you were 80 years old, you’ll understand that pain at times, can be debilitating.  Have you noticed though, that when you have more of an active day where you’re moving around more, or when you’ve been along to one of my pregnancy fitness or pregnancy Pilates classes, you find that you:

a) sleep better afterwards, and

b) have less pain as a result?

Well, that’s generally because, when you’re in my class anyway, I choose Pilates-based movements which focus on your pelvic floor and/or core muscles which help stabilise your pelvis and back.

In more cases than not, the stronger your abdominals, the stronger your back.  By doing Pilates-based exercise which focuses on your pelvic floor and transverses abdominus (deep core) muscles, this enables you to manage and in some cases, eradicate any discomfort felt.

If you’re experiencing any pain in the front of your pelvic eg near your pubic bone, or to one side of your lower back, then you may indeed have the early stages of SPD/PGP.

A Specialist will then advise you to work your pelvic floor muscles effectively, get some strength into your core muscles, and give you a series of, guess what – Pilates-based exercises to do at home to keep things in check.

So, all in all, Pilates really is one of the safest and most beneficial forms of exercise for expectant women to be doing at any stage of their pregnancy.  I truly believe that if more mums-to-be did Pregnancy-specific Pilates to keep their pelvic floor/core/pelvic stabilising muscles strong, then fewer women would suffer with back pain.

What are your experiences of Pilates during pregnancy?  Have you found it’s helped you?  I’d love to hear your thoughts, so drop me a line.

My pregnancy fitness or pregnancy Pilates classes use Pilates-based movement which focus on your pelvic floor and/or core muscles to help stablise your pelvis and back.

With so many of your suffering with back and pelvic pain in class at the moment, I thought I’d send you out a quick article regarding what exercise is safe to perform during pregnancy.

 

If you haven’t heard of Pelvic Girdle Pain, then read my blog – ‘What is Pelvic Girdle Pain?‘to find out a little more about what the condition is, what it affects, and why you feel pain in certain areas.

 

As many as 20% of women can suffer with pelvic and/or back pain during pregnancy, but I’m here to ease your mind and inform you that exercise, under the right instruction can make your symptoms better.

 

If you’ve ever been sat down/driving for several hours and then gone to stand up/get out of your car and felt like you were 80 years old, you’ll understand that pain at times, can be debilitating.  Have you noticed though, that when you have more of an active day where you’re moving around more, or when you’ve been along to one of my classes, you: a) sleep better afterwards, and b) have less pain as a result?

 

Well, that’s generally because, when you’re in my class anyway, I choose Pilates-based movements which focus on your pelvic floor and/or core muscles which help stabilise your pelvis and back.

 

In more cases than not, the stronger your abdominals, the stronger your back.  By doing Pilates-based exercise which focuses on your pelvic floor and transverses abdominus (deep core) muscles, this enables you to manage and in some cases, eradicate any discomfort felt.

 

If you’re experiencing any pain in the front of your pelvic eg near your pubic bone, or to one side of your lower back, then you may indeed have the early stages of SPD/PGP.

 

As I say, it’s quite common to have back and pelvic pain during pregnancy and after birth, but if you’re in any doubt, my suggestion would be to chat to your Midwife and she’ll then refer you on to a Physio, Osteopath or Chiropractor who specialises in treating pre/postnatal women with this condition.

 

A Specialist will then advise you to work your pelvic floor muscles effectively, get some strength into your core muscles, and give you a series of, guess what – Pilates-based exercises to do at home to keep things in check.

 

So, all in all, Pilates really is one of the safest and most beneficial forms of exercise for expectant women to be doing at any stage of their pregnancy.  I truly believe that if more mums-to-be did Pregnancy-specific Pilates to keep their pelvic floor/core/pelvic stabilising muscles strong, then fewer women would suffer with back pain.

 

What are your experiences of Pilates during pregnancy?  Have you found it’s helped you?  I’d love to hear your thoughts, so drop me a line.

 

If you want to know which Pilates exercises will help fix pelvic girdle pain, click here to download a handy worksheet which runs through all of the exercises you need to perform, guiding you through step-by-step to help strengthen your core, pelvic floor and pelvic stabilising muscles.

Back pain and pelvic pain are synonymous with pregnancy, and once baby arrives, at times, you may feel like you’re 80 years old! pelvisSome people will sympathise greatly with you, others will simply smile and say: “Welcome to pregnancy!” which can be quite frustrating.

Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction, referred to as Pelvic Girdle Pain (PGP) describes pain in the joints of your pelvis. These joints include the symphysis pubis joint (SPJ) at the very front of your pelvis (ie your pubic bone) and/or the sacro-iliac joints (SIJ) at the back (ie where the back of your pelvis joins on to your spine).

If you have PGP, you’ll feel pain across the front or back of the pelvis, which can range from mild discomfort to severe pain.

If you’re experiencing any pelvic/lower back pain, I’d strongly suggest you be referred to a Physiotherapist, Chiropractor or Osteopath that deals specifically with pre/postnatal women.

62_pelvic floor

What these specialists will do is, they will assess the position and symmetry of movement of your pelvic joints; make a proper assessment; prescribe exercises for you to perform; and run through which movements may be exacerbating your condition.

If you’re experiencing back and/or pelvic pain at the moment during pregnancy, you have to understand that there may be certain things you’re doing throughout the day which are making your condition worse. By making a few modifications to simple day-to-day activities, it may have a real impact on the pain you’re experiencing.

So, without further ado, here are my top tips for movement to AVOID doing if you’re experiencing back/pelvic pain:

AVOID:

  • Standing on one leg
  • Bending and twisting to lift something
  • Carrying a toddler/baby on one hip
  • Sitting with your legs crossed
  • Sitting or standing for long periods
  • Lifting heavy objects (shopping bags, wet washing, vacuum cleaners, older children)
  • Vacuuming
  • Carrying anything in only one hand

Of course not all of these activities CAN realistically be avoided –but just try to get as much help as you can, go slowly and most importantly, think before you move.

If you have any questions, do get in touch. I’m more than happy to help, as you know.

Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction, referred to as Pelvic Girdle Pain (PGP) describes pain in the joints of your pelvis. These joints include the symphysis pubis joint (SPJ) at the very front of your pelvis (ie your pubic bone) and/or the sacro-iliac joints (SIJ) at the back (ie where the back of your pelvis joins on to your spine). Take a look at the image of the pelvis, to familiar yourself with the joints.

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Pelvic Girdle Pain (PGP) is quite common during and after pregnancy. In fact, as many as 20% of women can suffer with the condition.

You may have Googled or indeed have a condition called SPD (Symphisis Pubis Dynsfunction) and put simply, PGP is just the new “umbrella term” used for any pain or misalignment associated with the front and/or back of your pelvis, hence the reason I’m using PGP, not SPD in this article.

If you have do a quick search for a picture of the female pelvis, you’ll see a join at the front called the symphysis pubis (essentially, you’re pubic bone).

Hormones in your body during pregnancy can cause the ligaments that hold ALL of your pelvis together (so not just the join at the front) to become a little more elastic and, or well, less stable.

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